Agricultural biodiversity – Use it or lose it!

Source: Agricultural biodiversity – Use it or lose it!

Advertisements

Largest-ever micro-insurance payout made to Ethiopian pastoralists

Access to agricultural credit and insurance must be a priority to provide a coping mechanism. But where Agricultural credit is very expensive and insurance is not affordable and out of reach, how can we achieve Vision 2040?
We can learn from Ethiopia.

More than 2,250 pastoralists received insurance payouts following the extremely poor rains this year in southern Ethiopia. Low levels of rainfall have led to the loss of approximately 300,000 livestock in 2017 in the Borana zone of the southern Oromia region.

ILRI news

More than 2,250 pastoralists received insurance payouts following the extremely poor rains this year in southern Ethiopia. Low levels of rainfall have led to the loss of approximately 300,000 livestock in 2017 in the Borana zone of the southern Oromia region. The insurance payouts of more than ETB 5.233 million (USD 220,000) was the largest-ever micro-insurance indemnity made in Ethiopia. Each insured pastoralist received an average of ETB 2,255 (USD 96), which will allow the herders to purchase feeds for their surviving animals and to restock their herds.

Pastoralists in northern Kenya and southern Ethiopia have been insured by an index-based livestock insurance (IBLI) scheme devised in 2008 by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and its technical partners at Cornell University and the University of California at Davis. The Ethiopian component of this project was underwritten by the Oromia Insurance Company and introduced to eight districts of Borana in…

View original post 453 more words

Lessons learnt out of Africa: 19 factors not to underestimate in rural livestock/agricultural research for development

Do not underestimate the disjunct between university calendars and the need for university staff to spend large amounts of time in the field, listening and learning from farmers.

ILRI news

Robyn Alders at her poultry work with her village partners in central Tanzania (photo via The Canberra Times).

Robyn Alders, a veterinarian, village poultry expert and associate professor at the University of Sydney’s School of Life and Environmental Sciences, gave a particularly candid and interesting presentation at a seminar/webinar held on 4 May 2017 at the headquarters of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), in Nairobi, Kenya. The one-day seminar/webinar was on the subject of ‘Animal-source foods for nutrition impact: Evidence and good practices for informed project design‘. This was the fourth in a Livestock and Household Nutrition Learning Series of seminars/webinars organized jointly by Land O’Lakes International Development and ILRI and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

View, watch and listen to Alders’ half-hour slide presentation—‘Impact of poultry interventions on household nutrition in Tanzania and lessons learnt…

View original post 1,656 more words

Governance and investment opportunities in Uganda’s pig value chains

FARMERS OF THE WORLD UNITE, you have better prices to gain..
There is need to promote business models that require horizontal integration of producers into collectives to improve their bargaining power for better terms of trade and lower transaction costs relating to transportation due to economies of scale.

ILRI policies, instititions and livelihoods program

Cross breed sow and piglets on a farm in Masaka district, Uganda

A sow and piglets at a farm in Masaka, Uganda (photo credit: ILRI/Apollo Habtamu).

Piggery is an important sector in Uganda and a source of livelihood to over 1.1 million households. With an estimated pig population of 3.2 million (that is projected to grow to 8 million by 2020), the pig value chain is dominated by smallholder producers and small and medium enterprises (SMEs) operating under informal business relationships and unstructured markets which limit integration, coordination and overall performance.

A recent study by scientists from the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) analyses the governance structures in Uganda’s smallholder pig value chain to identify inclusive models that could enhance integration and competitiveness of these SMEs. Using the New Institutional Economics framework, the study utilized cross-sectional and survey data from randomly selected value chain actors in four districts.

The findings of the study, published in the International Food and Agribusiness Review journal show that…

View original post 208 more words

Livestock-based solutions for sustainable development in Africa

ILRI Clippings

Conference speaker table Seventh Multistakeholder Partnership Meeting of the Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock, 8–12 May 2017, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (photo credit: ILRI/Susan MacMillan)

African ministers and private-sector and farmer representatives to untap the potential of the livestock revolution

In 2016, the United Nations issued a report highlighting the centrality of the livestock sector to the food sector and the promotion of sustainable development. Driven by population and economic growth, particularly in Africa, demand for livestock products is expected to increase by about 70% in the coming 30 years. No longer constrained by weak domestic demand on the continent, the sector in Africa today still faces many challenges which require long-term planning, coordination and investment. The development and implementation of roadmaps for livestock sector in Africa have the capacity to drive sustained economic growth, inclusive social and human development, and an efficient use of natural resources.

Momentum to unleash the sector’s…

View original post 873 more words

Simplistic livestock solutions no help for poor people in transition from smallholders to ‘smartholders’

ILRI news

Australian Nobel laureate Peter Doherty (left), former chair of the program committee of the ILRI Board of Trustees, and Australian Lindsay Falvey, current chair of the ILRI Board of Trustees. 

Jimmy Smith, director general of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), who previously led the World Bank’s global livestock portfolio, was in Australia last week, talking to ILRI’s scientific colleagues and donor representatives in Canberra and Melbourne. ILRI is chaired by Australian Lindsay Falvey and its patron is Australian Nobel Prize laureate Peter Doherty.

Smith was in Australia for public addresses and meetings on the critical role of livestock in global food and nutrition security. In his talks, he countered some of the simplistic solutions to sustainability and health suggested for the livestock sector. Here’s some of what he had to say.

There is no moral equivalence between those who make bad food choices and consume too much…

View original post 598 more words