Combating Newcastle Disease – for profitable poultry farming in Uganda

Poultry farming is one of the easiest agribusiness ventures. You can start with a few chickens in the backyard and rise to a semi – intensive operation, and onward to a large commercial venture with reasonable profit margins.

However, poultry diseases continue to be the stumbling block to the farmers’ dreams and aspirations. The most important disease is Newcastle Disease (ND), locally known as ‘mweela-byaalo’ in Luganda, ‘Geng’ in Luo, ‘omuraramo’ in Runyakitara; and ‘Echoro‘ in Ateso.

Torticollis (twisted neck) is a classic symptom of Newcastle Disease as seen with this broiler chicken

The local names accurately depict the devastation caused by NCD outbreaks. Chickens, baby turkeys, pigeons, ducklings, baby ostriches and guinea fowl- both local and exotic- are affected.

Clinical signs appear within 2 – 12 days, manifested by greenish diarrhea, difficulty in breathing, unsteady movement, drooping of wings, twisted neck, and massive deaths. Dealing with Newcastle Disease Vaccination is the only sure way to defeat the menace of Newcastle Disease. There is no cure. The good news is that a highly effective vaccine is readily available. Registered

Kukustar is a highly effective vaccine against Newcastle disease and very affordable to farmers with small to commercial flocks. It currently available in vials of 100, 200 and 500 doses.

  under the trade name of KUKUSTAR®, it is manufactured at the Uganda Industrial Research Institute, by BRENTEC. This vaccine has been approved by the National Drug Authority and PANVAC. Farmers who have adopted vaccination have seen a rapid rise in their flock size due to increased survival of their birds. Vaccination is by eye drop if the flock size is small; or through un-chlorinated drinking water if the flock size is large; and in hatcheries by spraying. KUKUSTAR® does not require to be kept on ice.
This vaccine shall soon be available beyond the borders of Uganda, throughout East Africa.
For more information, contact: +256-774 205900 /+256-701-048673 Key Accounts Manager – CKL (U) Ltd

 
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Welcome to the Gutenberg Editor

Of Mountains & Printing Presses

The goal of this new editor is to make adding rich content to WordPress simple and enjoyable. This whole post is composed of pieces of content—somewhat similar to LEGO bricks—that you can move around and interact with. Move your cursor around and you’ll notice the different blocks light up with outlines and arrows. Press the arrows to reposition blocks quickly, without fearing about losing things in the process of copying and pasting.

What you are reading now is a text block the most basic block of all. The text block has its own controls to be moved freely around the post…

… like this one, which is right aligned.

Headings are separate blocks as well, which helps with the outline and organization of your content.

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Handling images and media with the utmost care is a primary focus of the new editor. Hopefully, you’ll find aspects of adding captions or going full-width with your pictures much easier and robust than before.

Beautiful landscape
If your theme supports it, you’ll see the “wide” button on the image toolbar. Give it a try.

Try selecting and removing or editing the caption, now you don’t have to be careful about selecting the image or other text by mistake and ruining the presentation.

The Inserter Tool

Imagine everything that WordPress can do is available to you quickly and in the same place on the interface. No need to figure out HTML tags, classes, or remember complicated shortcode syntax. That’s the spirit behind the inserter—the (+) button you’ll see around the editor—which allows you to browse all available content blocks and add them into your post. Plugins and themes are able to register their own, opening up all sort of possibilities for rich editing and publishing.

Go give it a try, you may discover things WordPress can already add into your posts that you didn’t know about. Here’s a short list of what you can currently find there:

  • Text & Headings
  • Images & Videos
  • Galleries
  • Embeds, like YouTube, Tweets, or other WordPress posts.
  • Layout blocks, like Buttons, Hero Images, Separators, etc.
  • And Lists like this one of course 🙂

Visual Editing

A huge benefit of blocks is that you can edit them in place and manipulate your content directly. Instead of having fields for editing things like the source of a quote, or the text of a button, you can directly change the content. Try editing the following quote:

The editor will endeavor to create a new page and post building experience that makes writing rich posts effortless, and has “blocks” to make it easy what today might take shortcodes, custom HTML, or “mystery meat” embed discovery.

Matt Mullenweg, 2017

The information corresponding to the source of the quote is a separate text field, similar to captions under images, so the structure of the quote is protected even if you select, modify, or remove the source. It’s always easy to add it back.

Blocks can be anything you need. For instance, you may want to add a subdued quote as part of the composition of your text, or you may prefer to display a giant stylized one. All of these options are available in the inserter.

You can change the amount of columns in your galleries by dragging a slider in the block inspector in the sidebar.

Media Rich

If you combine the new wide and full-wide alignments with galleries, you can create a very media rich layout, very quickly:

Accessibility is important — don’t forget image alt attribute

Sure, the full-wide image can be pretty big. But sometimes the image is worth it.

The above is a gallery with just two images. It’s an easier way to create visually appealing layouts, without having to deal with floats. You can also easily convert the gallery back to individual images again, by using the block switcher.

Any block can opt into these alignments. The embed block has them also, and is responsive out of the box:

You can build any block you like, static or dynamic, decorative or plain. Here’s a pullquote block:

Code is Poetry

The WordPress community

If you want to learn more about how to build additional blocks, or if you are interested in helping with the project, head over to the GitHub repository.


Thanks for testing Gutenberg!

👋

Impoverishing a Banana Republic in name of ‘service delivery’.

Ever since the term ‘service delivery’ entered Ugandan political lexicon, I have always wondered what it meant. But the political schemers are always ahead thinking new ‘catch phrases’ to cover to explain away continued gross mismanagement and wastage of limited public resources. More districts, more municipalities, more constituencies, and more things that defy logic.

One only need to move around this country to appreciate the emptiness of ‘service delivery’. All you see is people resigned to their fate, looking to Providence or as it would be their ‘miracle’- working ‘Gods’ to provide them any relief. Little wonder, that the only service industry thriving in this country is the business of ‘selling hope’; from traditional healers to Pentecostal ‘churches’.

But how did this happen? How did we get here? That everyday, more and more people fall in extreme poverty.

The world bank says that many vulnerable families are one health crisis away from destitution, this could be illness of major breadwinner like that bodaboda cyclist who gets into an accident and is hospitalised for 6 months or their draught ox going down with tick borne disease or tsetse fly transmitted trypanosomiasis.

Have you ever wondered what this ‘service delivery’ actually is? It is a political ideal like a sort of Utopia only to be discussed, dreamt about and never to take any actionable strategies and steps leading there?

To be completed later.

Largest-ever micro-insurance payout made to Ethiopian pastoralists

Access to agricultural credit and insurance must be a priority to provide a coping mechanism. But where Agricultural credit is very expensive and insurance is not affordable and out of reach, how can we achieve Vision 2040?
We can learn from Ethiopia.

More than 2,250 pastoralists received insurance payouts following the extremely poor rains this year in southern Ethiopia. Low levels of rainfall have led to the loss of approximately 300,000 livestock in 2017 in the Borana zone of the southern Oromia region.

ILRI news

More than 2,250 pastoralists received insurance payouts following the extremely poor rains this year in southern Ethiopia. Low levels of rainfall have led to the loss of approximately 300,000 livestock in 2017 in the Borana zone of the southern Oromia region. The insurance payouts of more than ETB 5.233 million (USD 220,000) was the largest-ever micro-insurance indemnity made in Ethiopia. Each insured pastoralist received an average of ETB 2,255 (USD 96), which will allow the herders to purchase feeds for their surviving animals and to restock their herds.

Pastoralists in northern Kenya and southern Ethiopia have been insured by an index-based livestock insurance (IBLI) scheme devised in 2008 by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and its technical partners at Cornell University and the University of California at Davis. The Ethiopian component of this project was underwritten by the Oromia Insurance Company and introduced to eight districts of Borana in…

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Lessons learnt out of Africa: 19 factors not to underestimate in rural livestock/agricultural research for development

Do not underestimate the disjunct between university calendars and the need for university staff to spend large amounts of time in the field, listening and learning from farmers.

ILRI news

Robyn Alders at her poultry work with her village partners in central Tanzania (photo via The Canberra Times).

Robyn Alders, a veterinarian, village poultry expert and associate professor at the University of Sydney’s School of Life and Environmental Sciences, gave a particularly candid and interesting presentation at a seminar/webinar held on 4 May 2017 at the headquarters of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), in Nairobi, Kenya. The one-day seminar/webinar was on the subject of ‘Animal-source foods for nutrition impact: Evidence and good practices for informed project design‘. This was the fourth in a Livestock and Household Nutrition Learning Series of seminars/webinars organized jointly by Land O’Lakes International Development and ILRI and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

View, watch and listen to Alders’ half-hour slide presentation—‘Impact of poultry interventions on household nutrition in Tanzania and lessons learnt…

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Governance and investment opportunities in Uganda’s pig value chains

FARMERS OF THE WORLD UNITE, you have better prices to gain..
There is need to promote business models that require horizontal integration of producers into collectives to improve their bargaining power for better terms of trade and lower transaction costs relating to transportation due to economies of scale.

ILRI policies, instititions and livelihoods program

Cross breed sow and piglets on a farm in Masaka district, Uganda

A sow and piglets at a farm in Masaka, Uganda (photo credit: ILRI/Apollo Habtamu).

Piggery is an important sector in Uganda and a source of livelihood to over 1.1 million households. With an estimated pig population of 3.2 million (that is projected to grow to 8 million by 2020), the pig value chain is dominated by smallholder producers and small and medium enterprises (SMEs) operating under informal business relationships and unstructured markets which limit integration, coordination and overall performance.

A recent study by scientists from the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) analyses the governance structures in Uganda’s smallholder pig value chain to identify inclusive models that could enhance integration and competitiveness of these SMEs. Using the New Institutional Economics framework, the study utilized cross-sectional and survey data from randomly selected value chain actors in four districts.

The findings of the study, published in the International Food and Agribusiness Review journal show that…

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