Governance and investment opportunities in Uganda’s pig value chains

FARMERS OF THE WORLD UNITE, you have better prices to gain..
There is need to promote business models that require horizontal integration of producers into collectives to improve their bargaining power for better terms of trade and lower transaction costs relating to transportation due to economies of scale.

ILRI livelihoods, gender and impact

Cross breed sow and piglets on a farm in Masaka district, Uganda

A sow and piglets at a farm in Masaka, Uganda (photo credit: ILRI/Apollo Habtamu).

Piggery is an important sector in Uganda and a source of livelihood to over 1.1 million households. With an estimated pig population of 3.2 million (that is projected to grow to 8 million by 2020), the pig value chain is dominated by smallholder producers and small and medium enterprises (SMEs) operating under informal business relationships and unstructured markets which limit integration, coordination and overall performance.

A recent study by scientists from the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) analyses the governance structures in Uganda’s smallholder pig value chain to identify inclusive models that could enhance integration and competitiveness of these SMEs. Using the New Institutional Economics framework, the study utilized cross-sectional and survey data from randomly selected value chain actors in four districts.

The findings of the study, published in the International Food and Agribusiness Review journal show that…

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Livestock-based solutions for sustainable development in Africa

ILRI Clippings

Conference speaker table Seventh Multistakeholder Partnership Meeting of the Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock, 8–12 May 2017, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (photo credit: ILRI/Susan MacMillan)

African ministers and private-sector and farmer representatives to untap the potential of the livestock revolution

In 2016, the United Nations issued a report highlighting the centrality of the livestock sector to the food sector and the promotion of sustainable development. Driven by population and economic growth, particularly in Africa, demand for livestock products is expected to increase by about 70% in the coming 30 years. No longer constrained by weak domestic demand on the continent, the sector in Africa today still faces many challenges which require long-term planning, coordination and investment. The development and implementation of roadmaps for livestock sector in Africa have the capacity to drive sustained economic growth, inclusive social and human development, and an efficient use of natural resources.

Momentum to unleash the sector’s…

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